WVWRI Welcomes New Environmental Scientist

Written by Andrew Stacy on . Posted in Blog, News

Chapman_Chance

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – The West Virginia Water Research Institute (WVWRI) is pleased to announce that Chance Chapman has joined its team as its new Environmental Scientist. The WVWRI is a program of the National Research Center for Coal and Energy at West Virginia University. Chapman, a West Virginia native, earned his undergraduate degree in Natural Resource Management from Glenville State University.

“I look forward to being able to put my skillset to work in a way which positively impacts the environment and aids in working towards the goal of leaving the environment better than when one of our projects began,” said Chapman.

Most recently, Chapman earned his Juris Doctor from the West Virginia University College of Law with a concentration in Energy and Sustainable Development Law, something which he feels will benefit him greatly in his new position.

“My combination of education in both the scientific and legal aspects of environmental protection and restoration has provided me with a unique understanding of both the scientific and legal issues associated with water quality management,” he continued.

In his new role, Chapman will perform water chemistry-related field and laboratory research activities and will help implement land reclamation projects by collaborating with state and federal agencies, watershed organizations, university researchers and external contractors.

“I have always had an interest in the outdoors and the environment,” said Chapman. “Growing up in West Virginia I have seen firsthand the positives and negatives that go along with mineral extraction. In my new role at WRI, I am excited to be involved in research that could potentially have positive impacts on both industry and communities.”

Chapman is excited to get to work doing something that is important to him and that he enjoys. His professional interests include energy, sustainable development and natural resource management.

“We are very lucky to have Chance join our team,” said Melissa O’Neal, program manager for the WVWRI. “His education and experience will be of great value to our staff and will provide us with more opportunity for collaboration with state and private entities.”

Contact:
Andrew Stacy, Public Relations Coordinator, West Virginia Water Research Institute
304-293-7085
astacy@mail.wvu.edu

Wheeling Jesuit University Biology Team To Assist WVU In $350,000 Water Monitoring Quality Study

Written by WTOV on . Posted in News

WHEELING, W.Va. — Wheeling Jesuit University biology students, along with Professor Dr. Ben Stout, will assist the West Virginia Water Research Institute and West Virginia University with a $350,000 grant to expand a regional water quality monitoring program called Three Rivers QUEST.
The Colcom Foundation, a Pittsburgh-based private foundation dedicated to fostering a sustainable environment, provided for the launch of the Mon River QUEST in 2010 after monitoring began in 2009 on the Monongahela River through a U.S. Geological Survey grant. The effort expanded to become Three Rivers QUEST (3RQ), with Colcom Foundation contributing more than…Read the full article at the WTOV website.

New Report Finds Little Fracking Pollution in Monongahela River

Written by Nick Farrell, WBOY, June 5, 2015 on . Posted in News

MORGANTOWN – A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey shows that changes in the quality of water in the Monongahela River are minimal, despite 8 years of steady oil and gas drilling in West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Most contaminants found in groundwater during this survey were attributed to coal mining, not gas extraction. According to a local expert, that has been the trend since close monitoring of the Monongahela River began in 2009.

“People jump to the assumption that the problem was with the gas industry, and they may have had perfectly good reasons to think that, but when we started monitoring the river in July of 2009, we very quickly found out that a lot of the salts are the sort of things you’d find out of coal mine drainage,” said Paul Ziemkiewicz, director of the West Virginia Water Research Institute.

Read the full article on the WBOY website.